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DC School Reform Now is educating, organizing and advocating to build support for public education strategies that prepare kids to become college and career ready.

06/05/2017

 By Kate McGee

June 5, 2017 

Hundreds of public school girls of color gathered at Howard University over the weekend for the first-ever REIGN Conference. The initiative, REIGN: Empower Young Women as Leaders, was started by D.C. Public Schools (DCPS) this year as a way to provide safe spaces for girls of color to express themselves. It was launched in the wake of criticism that the city’s public school system wasn’t giving girls the same level of support as boys of color.

Read more: http://bit.ly/2qUjrAx

06/01/2017

 May 31, 2017

Mid-year teacher turnover has caused major disruption at some D.C. public schools. At one school in particular, Ballou High School, more than a quarter of school faculty resigned before the academic year started in August. In response, teachers, students and parents are concerned about the decrease in quality instruction and its potential impact on student achievement. Why are the teachers resigning, what are students learning and how can principals retain teachers until the school year ends?

05/30/2017

 By Kellye Lynn 

May 23, 2017 

WASHINGTON (ABC7) — A major surprise for a Southeast Washington teacher deserving of recognition. Ketcham Elementary School Principal Maisha Riddlesprigger told ABC7 News, "He's grown and developed into one of our most outstanding teachers. He truly cares about his students."

Read more: http://bit.ly/2qWfsSX

05/30/2017

 May 19, 2017

As administrators, teachers, or any other sort of “expert” in education, we can often come into school communities thinking we know the answers, that we can “fix” things.

Read more: http://bit.ly/2qdRqzJ

05/30/2017

By Alejandra Matos 

May 22 , 2017 

Adrian Washington fills a large plastic bag with two cartons of ripe strawberries, potatoes, a bushel of kale and a few tomatoes.

Read more: http://wapo.st/2rMnqLA

05/30/2017

 By Emma Brown, Valerie Strauss and Daniel Douglas-Gabriel 

May 17, 2017 

Funding for college work-study programs would be cut in half, public-service loan forgiveness would end and hundreds of millions of dollars that public schools could use for mental health, advanced coursework and other services would vanish under a Trump administration plan to cut $10.6 billion from federal education initiatives, according to budget documents obtained by The Washington Post.

Read more: http://wapo.st/2rs7DCa

05/30/2017

 May 17, 2017

Mayor Muriel Bowser has instituted a new order regarding public school admission for the children of mayoral appointees. The order is in response to a report by the D.C. Inspector General that found former schools chancellor Kaya Henderson granted discretionary out-of-boundary placements to politically-connected parents. How will the mayor and the schools system restore faith in the lottery for D.C. parents?

Read more: http://bit.ly/2qrwZl8

05/30/2017

 By Claudio Sanchez 

May 16, 2017

The Trump administration has made school choice, vouchers in particular, a cornerstone of its education agenda. This has generated lots of interest in how school voucher programs across the country work and whom they benefit.

Read more: https://n.pr/2otnn8w

05/30/2017

 May 5, 2017

My family is from the Dominican Republic. I was raised by a single parent in a low-income household. My mother has been set on me going to college. She doesn’t hope for it—she expects it, especially since my older sister graduated from college and is now in grad school. I’m going to be the second person in my family to graduate from college.

Read more: http://educationpost.org/my-mom-and-kipp-dont-just-hope-fo…/

05/30/2017

 By Alejandra Matos

April 30, 2017

Niciera Armor was starting to take her classes more seriously. That was her “rose.” But she was also letting little things get to her, making her angry and forcing her to fight to control her anger. That was her “thorn.”

Read more: http://wapo.st/2qvQQka

05/30/2017

By Jenari Mitchell

May 1, 2017

The United States abolished slavery in 1865, but still today in the 21st century, my race suffers from profiling, police brutality and negative stereotypes. If I had a dollar for every time I was stopped by an officer for “fitting the profile,” my college books would be paid for.

Read more: bit.ly/2p67we7

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