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DC School Reform Now is educating, organizing and advocating to build support for public education strategies that prepare kids to become college and career ready.

07/31/2017

By Kate McGee

June 29, 2017

When Trayvon McKoy moved to Washington, D.C., from Maryland about two years ago, he'd never played drums before in his life. Then, when he enrolled at Ballou High School, he says he didn't have much choice.

Read more: http://n.pr/2tR1CU3

07/31/2017

By Dr. Howard Fuller, Chris Stewart, and Derrell Bradford

June 26, 2017

Education reform is at a crossroads in this country. And it seems the issue of parent choice — who should have it, how much of it there should be, and for what schools — will determine the direction many reformers will take.

Read more: http://bit.ly/2si0rgj

07/31/2017

By Kate McGee

June 26, 2017

At Turner Elementary School in Southeast D.C., Torren Cooper is the only male of color who works directly in the classroom even though the student body is 98 percent African American. Cooper is a literacy coach helping some of Turner’s youngest pupils with their reading and writing skills, including rhyming, alliteration, letter sounds and writing their names.

Read more: http://bit.ly/2tb32rh

07/31/2017

By Joe Heim

June 23, 2017

A federal appeals court on Friday ruled that the D.C. government is not doing enough to find and assist young children with special needs who have not yet entered the school system.

Read more: http://wapo.st/2tcm0ON

07/31/2017

By Matt Fulle

June 22, 2017

In its latest attempt to combat this opportunity gap, the Seattle Public School District has started a student voice initiative to integrate the voices of African-American male students into policymaking.

Read more: http://bit.ly/2tWVKVt

07/31/2017

By Betheny Gross

June 21, 2017

In their efforts to expand school choice, city leaders have good intentions and lofty ambitions. They want to allow for diverse approaches to education, offering schools and programs that meet the demands and interests of a wide variety of students and families. They want to give both students and educators the opportunity to find their best fit. They want all children to have the chance to attend any school in the city, even if it isn’t in their neighborhood

07/31/2017

By Caroline Bauman

June 21, 2017

The 2014 exodus of six suburban towns from the newly consolidated Memphis school system is one of the nation’s most egregious examples of public education splintering into a system of haves and have-nots over race and class, says a new report

Read more: http://bit.ly/2sY7Lxe

07/31/2017

By Arianna Pickard

June 18, 2017

Founders of Greenwood Leadership Academy, a new “partnership school” expected to open in a Tulsa public school this fall, have been busy publicizing their vision for the school to be a community-oriented, rigorous program aiming to improve student outcomes in north Tulsa.

Read more: http://bit.ly/2sRsDVG

06/21/2017

By Mike Elsen-Rooney

June 20, 2017

When it comes to educating students from urban low-income families, according to a new study, one state leads the pack. And it’s one you might not expect.

Read more: http://bit.ly/2sQgrFc

06/21/2017

By Aidan Hoyal 

June 19, 2017

My child attends a Nashville charter school. But that might not make me the “charter supporter” you think I am. 

Read more: http://bit.ly/2sANzi7

06/21/2017

By John Flanagan 

June 19, 2017

New York’s primary obligation under the state Constitution is the fair and proper education of every child regardless of venue, regardless of ethnicity and, more importantly, regardless of wealth. 

Like my three children, I am a product of public education, and they and I are very lucky for it. We did not have to fight the way other parents have been forced to do because we had access and opportunity. I want that for every child.

Read more: http://nyp.st/2sTKWuE

06/21/2017

By Carolyn Phenicie

June 18, 2017

The rapid improvement in Washington, D.C.’s schools is one of the biggest education stories of the past decade. The graduation rate for D.C. Public Schools, which educate some 60 percent of K-12 students in the capital city, has jumped from 53 percent in 2011 to 69 percent in 2016.

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